Potsdam man headed to prison for child porn and drug sales

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CANTON — A Potsdam man charged with drug sales and multiple child pornography charges accepted a plea deal Friday in St. Lawrence County Court that will put him behind bars for more than a dozen years.

Joshua J. Carr, 34, of 12 B Clinton St., pleaded guilty to third-degree criminal sale of a controlled substance and promotion of an obscene sexual performance by a child in a plea deal with the district attorney’s office.

Carr was charged with the A-II felony of second-degree criminal sale of a controlled substance and in a second indictment charging him with both possession and promotion of an obscene sexual performance by a child.

On Nov. 1 in the town of Canton, Carr sold cocaine to another person. On April 1 in the town of Potsdam, he was in possession of a video of a child engaging in “lewd exhibition of the genital region,” which he promoted by sending it to another person.

Identified as the ring leader, Carr was one of six people picked up in a drug sting conducted by the St. Lawrence County Sheriff’s Office dubbed “Operation Car Wreck.”

As part of the plea deal, both charges lodged against Carr will be satisfied and he will be sentenced as a second offender to 11 years in prison with two years of post-release supervision on the drug charge and two to four years on the child pornography charge. Those sentences will be served consecutive to each other.

Carr will also forfeit $7,600 that was seized at the time of his arrest, part of which will go toward his $1,800 in fines, fees and surcharges and $2,275 in restitution and have to register as a sex offender.

Sentencing is scheduled for Sept. 17 and he was returned to the St. Lawrence County jail without bail.

In other court action Friday:

Timothy M. Sawyer, 34, of 23 Maple Ave., Edwards, pleaded guilty to attempted third-degree criminal possession of a controlled substance in a plea deal with the district attorney’s office.

On May 1, 2017, in the town of Clifton, Mr. Sawyer was in possession of heroin with the intent to sell it.

As part of the plea deal, the court committed to sentence Mr. Sawyer to five years of probation. He would also have to complete treatment, pay $375 in court fines fees and surcharges and $125 in restitution to the state police.

Mr. Sawyer was released under probation supervision and sentencing is scheduled for Sept. 17.

Desheila R. Thomas-Jandrew, 42, of 5279 County Route 14, Apt. 1, Chase Mills, pleaded guilty to two counts of third-degree criminal sale of a controlled substance in a plea deal with the district attorney’s office.

On Oct. 11 and 17, in the village of Massena, Ms. Thomas-Jandrew sold heroin to another person.

As part of the plea deal, Ms. Thomas-Jandrew will apply for the court’s Judicial Diversion Program and, if accepted and successfully completes the program, she will be sentenced to straight probation. If she is unsuccessful, there is no sentencing commitment from the court and she faces up to 18 years in prison with two years of post-release supervision.

Ms. Thomas-Jandrew will also have to complete domestic violence counseling and a mental health evaluation.

Sentencing is adjourned without a new date set and her case will be brought before the Judicial Diversion Program committee next month. Ms. Thomas-Jandrew was released under probation supervision.

Gage M. Landon, 22, of 1379 Route 37 C, Brasher, was released from St. Lawrence County jail, where he was being held on $7,500 cash bail or $15,000 bond following his arrest by state police on 15 counts of second-degree possession of a forged instrument, third-degree grand larceny, all felonies, and misdemeanor fifth-degree criminal possession of stolen property.

Troopers charged at about 2:30 p.m. on May 31 at the Seacomm Federal Credit Union in Massena, Mr. Landon cashed 15 checks in the amount of $4,250, which he stole from a 48-year-old Brasher resident, having forged the check owner’s name on the checks.

During his appearance in court on an order to show cause, County Court Judge Jerome J. Richards said Mr. Landon was being released as a plea agreement has been reached and that Mr. Landon will be entering a guilty plea to an indictment on Tuesday.

Judge Richards warned Mr. Landon that if he did not abide by the terms of his release under probation supervision which included testing negative for drugs and alcohol, he faced up to 112 years in prison on the charges against him.

Laura J. Wolf, 45, of 384 Route 345, Potsdam, entered a general denial that she again violated her five-year probation sentence for her conviction of fourth-degree criminal possession of stolen property.

On April 14, 2017, Ms. Wolf admitted to violating her probation and was resentenced to six months in the St. Lawrence County jail and continued on her five-year probation.

On Friday, she denied allegations that she failed to report to probation since Feb. 20, changed her address and phone number without notifying probation, had new charges brought against her for second-degree aggravated unlicensed operation and no license plate lamps, which she resolved with a Potsdam Town Court plea to unlicensed driver, and had to be extradited back to the state from Virginia.

A hearing is scheduled for Aug. 3 and she was returned to St. Lawrence County jail without bail.

Storm N. Rivera, 21, New York City, had his request to be released from the St. Lawrence County jail denied Friday and his bail was reduced from $100,000 cash bail or $200,000 bond to $10,000 cash bail and $20,000 bond.

Rivera is charged with felony first-degree rape and misdemeanor second-degree unlawful imprisonment and was released May 7 under the probation department’s electronic home monitoring.

His probation release was revoked on June 14 following probation reports alleging that the monitoring device attached to Rivera’s ankle reported him out of range on multiple occasions.

Public Defender Steven G. Ballan, argued that the device was defective and that he had photos of Rivera “in front of the box saying he is out of range.”

On Friday, Judge Richards said an evaluation of the device by the manufacturer determined that it was functioning properly, although the defense noted that “inexplicably the bracelet was sent out for review after a delay of 10 days.”

“If the ankle bracelet was to come back and it said that there was a problem with it, it could potentially create a problem for the folks who look at the ankle bracelet because it may call into question all of the other ankle bracelets,” Assistant Public Defender David F. Huber said.

“You think they are lying?” Judge Richards asked.

“I don’t think they are lying, judge, but I do think they have an interest in making sure the ankle bracelet works,” Mr. Huber said. “Mr. Rivera has maintained his innocence before he was indicted . . . (and) demonstrated while he was released on the ankle bracelet that he is not a flight risk.”

District Attorney Gary M. Pasqua said the circumstances have not changed.

“The only thing that changed is that we found out the ankle bracelet was working and the trial date has been moved,” Mr. Pasqua said.

A jury trial was scheduled for July 31 but has been adjourned at the request of both the prosecutors and defense to Oct. 1.

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